Beaner had Brain Worm for 10 Years from Eating Bad Mexican Food

Adrian Sol
Daily Stormer
January 30, 2020

You need to be careful with parasites.

While Chinese immigrants are currently bringing us the joy of bat soup viruses, that is far from being America’s first foray into immigration-related diseases.

In fact, the wave of illegals coming from down south is bringing along with them a wide variety of interesting parasites and diseases to enrich America.

Sky News:

A man whose headaches were so painful they made him vomit has finally found the source of his health problem – a tapeworm had been lodged in his brain for 10 years.

Doctors in Texas think the tapeworm had been growing slowly ever since the man – named only as Gerardo – contracted it from eating undercooked pork in Mexico more than a decade ago.

Here’s images of Geraldo and the brain parasite worm:

I can’t tell which is which – they both look like Mexicans to me.

Actually, according to political correctness, they should both be referred to as “undocumented Americans.” Sorry about that slip up.

Gerardo said he had been having headaches and “feeling off” for months before he had an MRI scan after fainting while playing football last year.

Describing the pain of his headaches, he told NBC affiliate KXAN-TV: “It’s very intense, very strong because it made me sweat too, sweat from the pain, pain in the head, and then, I would vomit from the pain.”

Dr Jordan Amadio, a neurosurgeon at Ascension Seton in Austin, said the case was “rare and truly extraordinary”.

“In certain regions of the country, like Texas and California, this can be more common,” he was reported as saying.

“So, there’s definitely something, I think, for every medical professional to be aware of.

Gee, I wonder why weird nightmare-fuel brain parasites are more common in Texas and California?

What do these two states have in common?

Could there be a link between an abundant population of illegal immigrants and Latinos and horrible diseases?

Several kinds of tapeworms cause the parasitic infection taeniasis, according to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

Eating raw or undercooked beef or pork is the primary risk factor for becoming infected.

Most people with tapeworm infections have no symptoms or only mild symptoms.

After a complex surgery to remove the tapeworm, Gerardo said he was back to his normal self and had returned to work.

A tapeworm had also been found in his sister’s brain years earlier.

It’s such a rare thing that both members of the same family have it, huh?

Also, if the primary risk factor is eating “undercooked beef or pork,” then why aren’t the French suffering from brain worms?

Raw beef steak is a typical European dish – it’s called steak tartare.

Or the Japanese?

Raw beef is also popular in Japan – it’s called beef tataki.

Could it be that the Europeans and the Asians eating raw meat aren’t getting nasty parasites because their kitchens and slaughterhouses aren’t disgusting cesspits?

Mexican slaughterhouse. No wonder their meat is full of parasites.

These are all good questions.

Frankly, if I had to choose between getting infected with the Coronavirus or with some weird Mexican brain parasite, I’ll choose the Coronavirus without hesitation. As such, I’m immediately stopping my consumption of raw beef and pork from questionable Mexican restaurants, and stepping up my consumption of Chinese bat soup – big time. I’m talking 3-4 bowls of bat soup per day.

You know you’re eating top-shelf bat soup when the bat makes a face like this.

I recommend you all do the same.

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